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Center for Organ Recovery & Education (CORE) Supports National Minority Donor Awareness Week at Community Events

– Annual Observance Addresses Need for Organ, Tissue & Cornea Donation in Minority Communities–

Pittsburgh, August 3, 2015 – Did you know that more than half of the national transplant waiting list is made up of multicultural populations due to higher incidences of diabetes, hypertension and kidney disease? The Center for Organ Recovery & Education (CORE) is pleased to celebrate National Minority Donor Awareness Week, August 1-7, 2015, with organ donation awareness tables at a host of community events.  The annual national observance is designed to increase awareness of the need for organ, tissue and cornea donation in minority communities.

CORE will be present at the following locations encouraging organ donation awareness and donor designations:

  • August 2:  Summer Soul Line Dancing in the Park, Highland Park in Pittsburgh (7-9 p.m.)
  • August 4:  National Night Out, John F. Kennedy Center in Erie (4-8 p.m.)
  • August 6:  Urban League Lunch & Learn in Pittsburgh (12-1 p.m.)
  • August 7-8:  Pittsburgh Triathlon, Point State Park in Pittsburgh (8/7: 5-7 p.m., 8/8:  7-11 a.m.)
  • August 8-9:  Multifest in Charleston, WV (11 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily)

“There is an urgent need for organ donors in the multicultural community,” said Susan Stuart, president and CEO of CORE.  “The number of people in need of transplants far exceeds the number of organs, tissues and cornea for transplant, as more than half of these individuals are members of the multicultural community.  One organ donor can save the lives of eight individuals and one tissue donor can enhance the lives of up to 50 people. Members of our CORE staff and volunteers are committed to getting the word out about the importance of organ donation, and will provide information at these events across our service area this week.”

Consider these important statistics about organ donation in the multicultural communities:

  • According to Donate Life America, as of May 2015, there were 77,633 multicultural patients currently waiting for a life-saving organ transplant in the U.S.
  • African Americans and other minorities are three times more likely to suffer from end-stage renal disease than Caucasians.
  • African Americans represent the highest percentage of multicultural patients in need of a transplant.
  • Hispanic Americans comprise 12.5 percent of the U.S. population, yet they make up 18 percent of the candidates currently waiting for organ transplants.

Now in its 18th year, National Minority Donor Awareness Week honors minorities who have been donors, and encourages others to register as donors and take better care of their health in order to reduce the number needing a transplant.

About CORE
The Center for Organ Recovery & Education (CORE) is one of 58 federally designated not-for-profit organ procurement organizations (OPOs) in the United States. CORE works closely with donor families and designated health care professionals to coordinate the surgical recovery of organs, tissues and corneas for transplantation. CORE also facilitates the computerized matching of donated organs and placement of corneas. With headquarters in Pittsburgh and an office in Charleston, West Virginia, CORE oversees a region that encompasses 155 hospitals and almost six million people throughout western Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Chemung County, NY. For more information, visit www.core.org or call 1-800-DONORS-7.

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